Pitirim Alexandrovich Sorokin – Warrior for Love

Born in Russia on January 21, 1889, Sorokin lived a colorful, productive and heroic life, that led to possibly the world’s greatest study of creative love.

“Starting my life as a son of a poor itinerant artisan and peasant mother, I have subsequently been a farmhand, itinerant artisan, factory worker, clerk, teacher, conductor of a choir, revolutionary, political prisoner, journalist, student, editor of a metropolitan paper, member of Kerensky’s cabinet, an exile, professor at Russian, Czech, and American universities, and a scholar of an international reputation.”

Living under the Communist regime in Russia, he did all he could to speak for the freedom of the people and overthrow the Communist government.  He was arrested several times, and in 1918 was finally condemned to death by Lenin, but was eventually set free.  He returned to The University of St. Petersburg, founded the Department of Sociology there, and was again arrested and exiled.  He emigrated to America in 1922 and went on to found the Department of Sociology at Harvard, and established the Harvard Research Center in Creative Altruism in 1949, which he directed until his retirement. He was the author of 37 books and more than 400 articles.

In his autobiography, he gives much credit to the fact that he was well loved throughout his life.

(For a descriptive autobiography and list of his works and theories, visit SorokinFoundation.org)

A tireless researcher of creative altruism, Sorokin remained fearless in his ability to speak out against the machinations that work against the love, spirit and freedom that belong to every person.

“[T]he expectation of a severe opposition and other unpleasant consequences of my “deviant”—integralist—standpoint did not, for a moment, make me hesitate to publish these volumes. My usual “bullheadedness” (mentioned before), and my deepest conviction that a supreme duty of a scholar is “to tell the truth” as he sees it, regardless of any and all consequences, are probably responsible for a lack of hesitation, on my part, in challenging the prevalent theories in my later volumes. The expected opposition and some of the adverse “existential” consequences have come, indeed.”

Despite everything, he was pleased to see his work gain popularity among certain eminent thinkers around the world.  In his later years he observed:

“Personally I am gratified by both-positive and negative—reactions to my “mental productions.”

The work of Pitirim Sorokin has been one of the main inspirations behind The Technology of Love, by Charles E. Hansen, and continues to inspire a growing number of brave thinkers worldwide.

(Quotes taken from Autobiography, sorokinfoundation.org )

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Pitirim Alexandrovich Sorokin – Warrior for Love

Born in Russia on January 21, 1889, Sorokin lived a colorful, productive and heroic life, that led to possibly the world’s greatest study of creative love.

“Starting my life as a son of a poor itinerant artisan and peasant mother, I have subsequently been a farmhand, itinerant artisan, factory worker, clerk, teacher, conductor of a choir, revolutionary, political prisoner, journalist, student, editor of a metropolitan paper, member of Kerensky’s cabinet, an exile, professor at Russian, Czech, and American universities, and a scholar of an international reputation.”

Living under the Communist regime in Russia, he did all he could to speak for the freedom of the people and overthrow the Communist government.  He was arrested several times, and in 1918 was finally condemned to death by Lenin, but was eventually set free.  He returned to The University of St. Petersburg, founded the Department of Sociology there, and was again arrested and exiled.  He emigrated to America in 1922 and went on to found the Department of Sociology at Harvard, and established the Harvard Research Center in Creative Altruism in 1949, which he directed until his retirement. He was the author of 37 books and more than 400 articles.

In his autobiography, he gives much credit to the fact that he was well loved throughout his life.

(For a descriptive autobiography and list of his works and theories, visit SorokinFoundation.org)

A tireless researcher of creative altruism, Sorokin remained fearless in his ability to speak out against the machinations that work against the love, spirit and freedom that belong to every person.

“[T]he expectation of a severe opposition and other unpleasant consequences of my “deviant”—integralist—standpoint did not, for a moment, make me hesitate to publish these volumes. My usual “bullheadedness” (mentioned before), and my deepest conviction that a supreme duty of a scholar is “to tell the truth” as he sees it, regardless of any and all consequences, are probably responsible for a lack of hesitation, on my part, in challenging the prevalent theories in my later volumes. The expected opposition and some of the adverse “existential” consequences have come, indeed.”

Despite everything, he was pleased to see his work gain popularity among certain eminent thinkers around the world.  In his later years he observed:

“Personally I am gratified by both-positive and negative—reactions to my “mental productions.”

The work of Pitirim Sorokin has been one of the main inspirations behind The Technology of Love, by Charles E. Hansen, and continues to inspire a growing number of brave thinkers worldwide.

(Quotes taken from Autobiography, sorokinfoundation.org )

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Pitirim Alexandrovich Sorokin – Warrior for Love

Born in Russia on January 21, 1889, Sorokin lived a colorful, productive and heroic life, that led to possibly the world’s greatest study of creative love.

“Starting my life as a son of a poor itinerant artisan and peasant mother, I have subsequently been a farmhand, itinerant artisan, factory worker, clerk, teacher, conductor of a choir, revolutionary, political prisoner, journalist, student, editor of a metropolitan paper, member of Kerensky’s cabinet, an exile, professor at Russian, Czech, and American universities, and a scholar of an international reputation.”

Living under the Communist regime in Russia, he did all he could to speak for the freedom of the people and overthrow the Communist government.  He was arrested several times, and in 1918 was finally condemned to death by Lenin, but was eventually set free.  He returned to The University of St. Petersburg, founded the Department of Sociology there, and was again arrested and exiled.  He emigrated to America in 1922 and went on to found the Department of Sociology at Harvard, and established the Harvard Research Center in Creative Altruism in 1949, which he directed until his retirement. He was the author of 37 books and more than 400 articles.

In his autobiography, he gives much credit to the fact that he was well loved throughout his life.

(For a descriptive autobiography and list of his works and theories, visit SorokinFoundation.org)

A tireless researcher of creative altruism, Sorokin remained fearless in his ability to speak out against the machinations that work against the love, spirit and freedom that belong to every person.

“[T]he expectation of a severe opposition and other unpleasant consequences of my “deviant”—integralist—standpoint did not, for a moment, make me hesitate to publish these volumes. My usual “bullheadedness” (mentioned before), and my deepest conviction that a supreme duty of a scholar is “to tell the truth” as he sees it, regardless of any and all consequences, are probably responsible for a lack of hesitation, on my part, in challenging the prevalent theories in my later volumes. The expected opposition and some of the adverse “existential” consequences have come, indeed.”

Despite everything, he was pleased to see his work gain popularity among certain eminent thinkers around the world.  In his later years he observed:

“Personally I am gratified by both-positive and negative—reactions to my “mental productions.”

The work of Pitirim Sorokin has been one of the main inspirations behind The Technology of Love, by Charles E. Hansen, and continues to inspire a growing number of brave thinkers worldwide.

(Quotes taken from Autobiography, sorokinfoundation.org )

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Pitirim Alexandrovich Sorokin – Warrior for Love

Born in Russia on January 21, 1889, Sorokin lived a colorful, productive and heroic life, that led to possibly the world’s greatest study of creative love.

“Starting my life as a son of a poor itinerant artisan and peasant mother, I have subsequently been a farmhand, itinerant artisan, factory worker, clerk, teacher, conductor of a choir, revolutionary, political prisoner, journalist, student, editor of a metropolitan paper, member of Kerensky’s cabinet, an exile, professor at Russian, Czech, and American universities, and a scholar of an international reputation.”

Living under the Communist regime in Russia, he did all he could to speak for the freedom of the people and overthrow the Communist government.  He was arrested several times, and in 1918 was finally condemned to death by Lenin, but was eventually set free.  He returned to The University of St. Petersburg, founded the Department of Sociology there, and was again arrested and exiled.  He emigrated to America in 1922 and went on to found the Department of Sociology at Harvard, and established the Harvard Research Center in Creative Altruism in 1949, which he directed until his retirement. He was the author of 37 books and more than 400 articles.

In his autobiography, he gives much credit to the fact that he was well loved throughout his life.

(For a descriptive autobiography and list of his works and theories, visit SorokinFoundation.org)

A tireless researcher of creative altruism, Sorokin remained fearless in his ability to speak out against the machinations that work against the love, spirit and freedom that belong to every person.

“[T]he expectation of a severe opposition and other unpleasant consequences of my “deviant”—integralist—standpoint did not, for a moment, make me hesitate to publish these volumes. My usual “bullheadedness” (mentioned before), and my deepest conviction that a supreme duty of a scholar is “to tell the truth” as he sees it, regardless of any and all consequences, are probably responsible for a lack of hesitation, on my part, in challenging the prevalent theories in my later volumes. The expected opposition and some of the adverse “existential” consequences have come, indeed.”

Despite everything, he was pleased to see his work gain popularity among certain eminent thinkers around the world.  In his later years he observed:

“Personally I am gratified by both-positive and negative—reactions to my “mental productions.”

The work of Pitirim Sorokin has been one of the main inspirations behind The Technology of Love, by Charles E. Hansen, and continues to inspire a growing number of brave thinkers worldwide.

(Quotes taken from Autobiography, sorokinfoundation.org )

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